Category Archives: Recreation

Integrating UD into recreation camp activities

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There is no legislation within Australia to guide the design of sporting or leisure activities that enable participation by people with varied abilities. This publication outlines the importance of universal design and ways in which environments, activities and programs within residential camps can be used by people of all ages and abilities. It shows how to apply the seven principles of universal design to all aspects of camp activities. Sport and Recreation Victoria and YMCA have made this report available to increase awareness and applicability of universal design in residential camps. The image shows how anyone can enjoy the flying fox on the “Skyrider”.

THE ROLE OF INTEROCEPTION IN PLAY AND RECREATION

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This year, my kindergarten age son is learning about the five senses. His excitement for learning is nothing short of contagious as he analyzes daily interactions with the world based on which senses he is using. He correctly notices that an interaction with a tablet requires sight and touch and that his morning cereal feast results in taste and touch sensations.

Accessibility Guidebook for Outdoor Recreation and Trails

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This publication is an updated version of the original “Accessibility Guidebook for Outdoor Recreation and Trails” (2006 edition). The original guidebook was released the same day the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service accessibility guidelines were finalized as the legal standard for the agency. At that time, the Outdoor Developed Areas Accessibility Guidelines (ODAAG) under the Architectural Barriers Act were still under development by the U.S. Access Board.

Designing for Inclusive Play: Applying the Principles of Universal Design to the Playground

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The public playground is, by far, one of the most important settings for child development. It is one of the few environments where a child has the freedom to run and jump, climb, swing and leap, yell, reign, conjure, create, dream or meditate. In this complicated world that we live in, the playground is a safe and common place for children to come together, to discover the value of play, to learn about each other, to recognize their similarities and differences, to meet physical and social challenges, to leave comfort zones and evolve into the little young people they are meant to be. It is a microcosm for life lessons, from challenge and risk to conflict resolution and cooperation. When we design for these purposes and apply the Principles of Universal Design, we design for inclusive play where every child, regardless of ability or disability, is welcomed and benefits physically, developmentally, emotionally and socially from the environment.